Dave: 780 446 3727

Anita: 780 970 2789



 


Making your Real Estate needs my Priority




Dave Dry
Realtor, YEGPro Realty

Direct: 780 446 3727
Fax 1 866 217 4642

E mail: davedry@me.com
Website: www.davedry.com
Blog: blog.davedry.com

203,10432 123 Street

Edmonton, Alberta

T5N 1N7

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The First time home buyer incentive is now available. Please see the link below for more information.


https://www.placetocallhome.ca/fthbi/first-time-homebuyer-incentive#9



Making your Real Estate needs my Priority




Dave Dry
Realtor, YEGPro Realty

Direct: 780 446 3727
Fax 1 866 217 4642

E mail: davedry@me.com
Website: www.davedry.com
Blog: blog.davedry.com

203,10432 123 Street

Edmonton, Alberta

T5N 1N7

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Dave Dry and Anita Rivest

Realtors

Yegpro Realty

Dave: (780) 446 3727

Anita: (780) 970 2789

E-mail: 24-7@yegrealtors.ca

Website: yegrealtors.ca

Blog: yegrealtors.ca/blog
 
 
 
 
 
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Mark Ting · CBC News · Posted: Jan 20, 2019 6:00 PM PT | Last Updated: January 20


The global economy appears to be slowing and this could be welcome news for homeowners with mortgages linked to the prime lending rate. (CBC )

In the fall of 2018, many economists predicted that the Bank of Canada would increase interest rates three or four times in 2019, but that's no longer the case. The global economy appears to be slowing and rarely do central banks increase rates when an economy is struggling.

Any slowdown in rate hikes would be welcome news for those holding a mortgage or loan linked to the prime lending rate.

If you are considering a fixed rate mortgage, there is good news for you as well.



This week, RBC announced a reduction in their five-year fixed mortgage rate. Fixed rate mortgages are correlated to bond yields — if yields drop so should mortgage rates. Bond yields have been dropping for a couple months now so it is nice to (finally) see mortgage rates following suit.

A question that I am often asked is, "Should I get a variable or a fixed rate mortgage?"

I use both.


Certainty vs. savings
For my rental property, I prefer a variable mortgage. Not because of the reduced rate, but for the less punitive pre-payment penalty.

Because I never know when I'm going to sell my revenue property, I'd rather be in a mortgage that won't punish me too badly if I decide to sell before the end of my contract

And historically, people save more money with a variable mortgage. That said, fixed-term mortgages offer price certainty.

When rates started to increase in 2017, I decided to convert the variable mortgage on my principal residence into a seven-year fixed term mortgage. I'm okay paying a little extra for the added peace of mind. I have no intention of selling my home, so I don't have to worry about pre-payment penalties, and I have seven years worth of price certainty.


Another variable to consider when deciding on fixed versus variable mortgages is the promotions being offered by lenders.

Keep an eye out for lender promotions and discounts when considering your mortgage options. (Luke MacGregor/Reuters)
Just a couple of months ago, it was easy to get a variable mortgage at one per cent below the prime rate.

That's a significant discount and if the forecasters are right and Canada slows its pace of rate hikes — or even cuts rates — having a variable mortgage would have been the best choice.

If the forecasters are wrong, which they often are, and rates spike then you would have been better off with the price certainty of a fixed term. Unless you can predict the future, which the experts, including myself, cannot, it is hard to say which mortgage product is best for you.


Can't decide? Get both
With that said, it is time for my predictions.

I would be surprised to see the Bank of Canada raising rates more than once in 2019. It also wouldn't surprise me if there were no, or even a cut in interest rates. It really depends on the extent of the slow down in housing and energy, and how these changes affect the overall economy.

OPINION5 tips for renewing your mortgage
Rates for fixed-rate mortgages are dropping and there is potential for further reductions, but I wouldn't count on it. Money can flow out of the bond market just as easily as it flowed into it. If that were to happen, bond yields and mortgage rates would rise.

If you are unable to decide on the best mortgage for you—hedge your bets and get both.

Say you have a $400,000 mortgage, put $200,000 in a variable and the other $200,000 in a fixed. It is a strategy that has worked for me in the past and is a lot less nerve racking than flipping a coin.

This column is part of CBC's Opinion section. For more information about this section, please read our FAQ.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Mark Ting


Mark Ting is a partner with Foundation Wealth, where he helps clients reach their financial goals. He can also be heard every Thursday at 4:35 p.m. on CBC radio as On the Coast’s guide to personal finance. @MarkTingCFP mark.ting@foundationwealth.ca


Making your Real Estate needs my Priority



Dave Dry
Realtor, Yegpro Realty

Direct: 780 446 3727
Fax 1 866 217 4642

E mail: davedry@me.com
Website: www.davedry.com
Blog: blog.davedry.com

203,10432 123 Street

Edmonton, Alberta

T5N 1N7

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Real EstateCalgary HomesUrbanizedLifeNews 

Chandler WalterNov 23, 2018 4:35 pm



If you’re looking t o buy a home and happen to live in Alberta, you’re actually in luck.

Zoocasa, a brokerage that looks into the statistics surrounding Canadian real estate, has found that the Wild Rose province is far more affordable to buy real estate in when compared to Ontario and BC.

All 25 Albertan markets had a median annual income that would be capable of affording the average home within their respective cities, though some had a little more breathing room than others.

Calgary was actually the province’s second least affordable city, though the difference between the income of $63,925 per year required to afford the average home (valued at $468,634 as of October) was still $33,409 less than YYC’s median household income of $97,334.


houses

Least to most affordable cities/towns in Alberta (Zoocasa)

That margin was closed even more for the #1 least affordable municipality, Canmore, where the income required to own the average home ($94,998 a year) was only $3,908 less than the median household income ($98,906).

However, even the least affordable cities in Alberta are miles ahead of most cities in BC and Ontario, with the income gap between the average salary vs. what is needed to purchase a home being $97,866 over for those living in Vancouver.

houses

The most affordable place to live in Alberta is Fort McMurray, according to Zoocasa, though that seems to be largely influenced by the sky-high median salary of $195,656 a year — which stands in stark contrast against the needed income of $51,066 to own the average house in the area.

Cold Lake, Lethbridge, Lloydminster, CamroseMedicine Hat, and High River were the least expensive places to live when you didn’t take into account the median income, as all saw average home prices valued at less than $300,000.

A full infographic was provided by Zoocasa, with statistics being pulled from the Calgary Real Estate Board, Realtors Association of Edmonton, Lethbridge and District Association of Realtors, Medicine Hat Real Estate Board, Central Alberta Realtors Association, and the Canadian Real Estate Board.

All prices and incomes were from October 2018, with the exception of Camrose, Red Deer, and Sylvan Lake, where September was the latest available statistics.

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Dave Dry / Anita Rivest
Making your Real Estate needs our Priority
Yegpro Realty
yegrealtors.ca
Email: 24-7@yegrealtors.ca
Dave: 780 446 3727
Anita: 780 970 2789
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Data is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton.